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Question 1: Footnoting Practice <
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1a. Full Footnotes: <
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by | Mar 25, 2022 | History | 0 comments

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Question 1: Footnoting Practice
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1a. Full Footnotes:
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Within the body of your essay, you will need to provide footnote citations for your sources. A footnote is a numerical reference (called a superscript) embedded in the narrative itself and has a corresponding number at the bottom of the page with the source’s citation. Though footnoting is often under “References” in MS Word, different word processing programs have different toolbar commands for footnoting, so you’ll need to familiarize yourself with how yours works (note that footnotes are not the same as a footer).
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The major difference between bibliographic and footnote citations is the that bibliographic citations address the source as a whole, while footnotes (full or abbreviated) hone in on specific pages (or parts of the source). There are other important differences as well, including the order of an author’s name (first last vs. last, first) and punctuation.
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Consult the Chicago-style (Links to an external site.) page for a refresher on the differences between bibliographic and footnote citations.
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In your LRA 4 Word doc under a Question 1 heading, enter the correct full footnote citation for one of your books; label it as “Full Footnote.” You can use (a) page number(s) that correspond(s) with an example that you may use in your final essay.
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1b. Abbreviated Footnotes:
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For any single source, you can abbreviate all subsequent footnotes after the first one in the paper. Abbreviated footnotes typically include the author’s last name, shortened title, and page number.
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Consult the Chicago-style (Links to an external site.) page to look for examples of “abbreviated footnotes” for different types of sources.
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Enter the correct abbreviated footnote citation for the same book you used for the full footnote; label it as “Abbreviated Footnote.”
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Question 2: Final Essay Introduction and Outline
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Creating a draft introduction and a quality outline is a key step in nearly all research writing – and can help you to begin to see how the information you’ve gathered fits together, what it tells you about your subject, and if there is any addition information you may need to find.
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There are three main components to every essay: an introduction, body, and conclusion. In preparing your draft introduction and outline, there are key elements you should include in each part:
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The introduction: introduces your topic and foreshadows what will be covered in the body of the paper. Introductions for papers of this length are typically around 6-8 sentences, and include several components:
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The first 1-2 sentences introduce the topic to help the reader see what contemporary issue the paper will cover. This part often features a topical “hook,” or short example of your topic. (You might even consider using your contemporary news article as an opening example!)
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From there, the introduction transitions to foreshadow what will be covered in the body. Since your paper will focus on the roots of your contemporary issue, in 2-3 sentences summarize what history will be covered in the paper to help us understand the present issue.
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The introduction also includes your central argument (thesis statement) and, briefly, how you will prove your argument in 1-2 sentences (underline these parts so they are clearly identifiable to your instructor/TA).
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The body outline: ultimately becomes the body of the paper. An outline for the body identifies the key sections of the paper, and what evidence or points (along with their source citations) will be made in each. It may be organized by periods of time, or perhaps by geography or sub-topics.
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The conclusion: should summarize your main points and explain how a historical understanding of your issue is critical to understanding it in the present.
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Visit the Roots of Contemporary Issues website for a sample research essay outline (Links to an external site.) and tips on writing a strong thesis (Links to an external site.).
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Under Question 2 in your Word doc, provide a draft introduction, outline of the body of your essay, and a draft conclusion.
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Question 3: Self-Reflection – Draft Introduction and Outline
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Often as researchers are working on their drafts and outlines, they identify gaps where additional information is needed, topics they’d like to analyze a bit more, or things about their topics or sources they may want to revisit and revise.
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Go back to your LRA 3 Word document and copy and paste any comments from your instructor and/or teaching assistant about the sources you gathered under Question 3, so that you have them on hand. This reminds us of the suggestions we made about your sources, and reminds you of any advice for moving forward.
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In a paragraph of no less than eight sentences, explain how and why you have organized your outline the way you have, any concerns or questions you may have about it, and how your research project has developed since LRA 3.
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How did writing the draft introduction and outline help you organize the information you’ve gathered or your thoughts about your topic? Did you have any new insights about your project? Did you discover any parts where you realized you may need additional information? Were there any parts of the draft introduction or outline you were uncertain about?

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